Two years ago, 740,000 Rohingya people their homes in Myanmar to escape violence and persecution.

Photo Gallery | Two Years On Rohingya Crisis | 25 August 2019

Two years ago, 740,000 Rohingya people their homes in Myanmar to escape violence and persecution.  Carrying little except their desperate will to survive, they embarked on long journey to safety in Bangladesh.
Two years ago, 740,000 Rohingya people their homes in Myanmar to escape violence and persecution. Carrying little except their desperate will to survive, they embarked on long journey to safety in Bangladesh. Photo: Himaloy Joseph Mree

 

Children barely survived the grueling trek, coping with hunger,  exhaustion, and extreme weather— conditions even adults could hardly bear.
Children barely survived the grueling trek, coping with hunger,  exhaustion, and extreme weather—conditions even adults could hardly bear. Photo: Himaloy Joseph Mree

 

Women tried to be strong for their families as they set up shelters in the camps.
Women tried to be strong for their families as they set up shelters in the camps. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

Mothers didn’t even have blankets for their newborn babies.
Mothers didn’t even have blankets for their newborn babies. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

World Vision provided basic food, including  rice, lentils and oil. Shelter materials and blankets brought some comfort to families who had lost everything.
World Vision provided basic food, including  rice, lentils and oil. Shelter materials and blankets brought some comfort to families who had lost everything. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

Soon after the refugees arrived, World Vision set up child-friendly spaces where children could play in a safe space and begin to recover from the violence and loss they had experienced.
Soon after the refugees arrived, World Vision set up child-friendly spaces where children could play in a safe space and begin to recover from the violence and loss they had experienced. Photo: Himaloy Joseph Mree

 

Today, almost 1 million Rohingya live in what has become the world’s largest refugee camp.
Today, almost 1 million Rohingya live in what has become the world’s largest refugee camp. Photo: Jon Warren

 

PROTECTION  World Vision supports more than  370,000 Rohingya refugees living in the 23 camps, and Bangladeshis in need in host communities.    We provide principled, timely protection and assistance, which promotes the dignity of people, especially the  children.
PROTECTION
World Vision supports more than  370,000 Rohingya refugees living in the 23 camps, and Bangladeshis in need in host communities.We provide principled, timely protection and assistance, which promotes the dignity of people, especially the  children. Photo: Jon Warren

 

CHILD PROTECTION:  Rohingya children face many risks in the hazardous camps, including  injury, exploitation, abuse, child labour and abduction. Being in school helps keep them safe.
CHILD PROTECTION
Rohingya children face many risks in the hazardous camps, including  injury, exploitation, abuse, child labour and abduction. Being in school helps keep them safe. Photo: Jon Warren

 

CHILD PROTECTION:  World Vision’s child protection work includes informal education for children and adolescents. Children learn Burmese, English, math and life skills in our 21 centres.
World Vision’s child protection work includes informal education for children and adolescents. Children learn Burmese, English, math and life skills in our 21 centres. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

EDUCATION:  In the Rohingya culture, adolescent girls are usually restricted to their homes when they reach puberty.   However, many parents are eager to have their girls learn new skills at our training centres, such as tailoring, handicraft production and basic literacy.
EDUCATION
In the Rohingya culture, adolescent girls are usually restricted to their homes when they reach puberty. However, many parents are eager to have their girls learn new skills at our training centres, such as tailoring, handicraft production and basic literacy. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

EDUCATION:  Adolescent boys enjoy learning solar panel and light repair at World Vision’s multi-purpose centre.
Adolescent boys enjoy learning solar panel and light repair at World Vision’s multi-purpose centre. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE PREVENTION  Our women’s safe space is a place where women can build support networks as they learn new skills together for a better future.
GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE PREVENTION
Our women’s safe space is a place where women can build support networks as they learn new skills together for a better future. Photo: Karen Homer

 

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE  PREVENTION  World Vision trained 900 men and boys in gender-based violence awareness and prevention. They are becoming keen advocates for their wives, daughters, mothers and sisters.
World Vision trained 900 men and boys in gender-based violence awareness and prevention. They are becoming keen advocates for their wives, daughters, mothers and sisters. Photo: Jon Warren

 

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE PREVENTION  Imams and women leaders met to discuss ways to prevent child marriage during a recent World Vision Channels of Hope workshop.
Imams and women leaders met to discuss ways to prevent child marriage during a recent World Vision Channels of Hope workshop. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

WASH  Rohingya children learn about the importance of handwashing through our hygiene promotion sessions. World Vision has provided more than 300,000 refugees with water and sanitation services.
WASH
Rohingya children learn about the importance of handwashing through our hygiene promotion sessions. World Vision has provided more than 300,000 refugees with water and sanitation services. Photo: Jon Warren

 

MALNUTRITION PREVENTION: World Vision works to prevent and treat malnutrition among children under age 5 in its three feeding centres, operated in partnership with the World Food Programme.
MALNUTRITION PREVENTION
World Vision works to prevent and treat malnutrition among children under age 5 in its three feeding centres, operated in partnership with the World Food Programme. Photo: Jon Warren

 

MALNUTRITION PREVENTION: Jaheda celebrates 2-year-old Minara’s recovery from  moderate acute malnutrition after she received treatment at World Vision’s feeding centre.
Jaheda celebrates 2-year-old Minara’s recovery from  moderate acute malnutrition after she received treatment at World Vision’s feeding centre. Photo: Jon Warren

 

FOOD ASSISTANCE:  World Vision is providing direct life-saving food assistance to an estimated 247,415 people, working in partnership with the World Food Programme.   Refugees receive pre-paid e-vouchers that they use to purchase food from WFP shops. They no longer have to queue up for hours to get their monthly rations.
FOOD ASSISTANCE
World Vision is providing direct life-saving food assistance to an estimated 247,415 people, working in partnership with World Food Programme. Refugees receive pre-paid e-vouchers that they use to purchase food from WFP shops. They no longer have to queue up for hours to get their monthly rations. Photo: Md. Shabir Hussain

 

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION: Many Rohingya children must collect firewood daily so their families can cook. Their parents worry about them going to the distant forest, but it was the only option.
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Many Rohingya children must collect firewood daily so their families can cook. Their parents worry about them going to the distant forest, but it was the only option. Photo: Jon Warren

 

World Vision’s 42 Community Cooking and Learning Centres are equipped with five two-burner stoves fuelled by propane gas. Up to 1,050 women cook meals daily in the centres, benefiting some 5,250 family members. Their children no longer have to collect firewood.  At the centres, mothers learn new skills, such as nutritious cooking and vegetable gardening.
COMMUNITY COOKING AND LEARNING CENTRES
World Vision’s 42 Community Cooking and Learning Centres are equipped with five two-burner stoves fuelled by propane gas. Up to 1,050 women cook meals daily in the centres, benefiting some 5,250 family members. Their children no longer have to collect firewood. At the centres, mothers learn new skills, such as nutritious cooking and vegetable gardening. Photo: Jon Warren

 

World Vision hired 14,922 refugees, including 1,906women, to construct roads, pathways and bridges to prepare for the monsoon season.  The result: no lives were lost during the storms and flooding.
DISASTER RISK REDUCTION
World Vision hired 14,922 refugees, including 1,906women, to construct roads, pathways and bridges to prepare for the monsoon season. The result: no lives were lost during the storms and flooding. Photo: Jon Warren

 

To support local communities in need and provide short-term jobs, World Vision hired residents to strengthen infrastructure to prepare for the monsoons. This renovated school now doubles as a cyclone shelter for up to 6,000 people.
DISASTER RISK MITIGATION
To support local communities in need and provide short-term jobs, World Vision hired residents to strengthen infrastructure to prepare for the monsoons. This renovated school now doubles as a cyclone shelter for up to 6,000 people. Photo: Himaloy Joseph Mree

 

World Vision continues to advocate for the Rohingya’s safe, voluntary and dignified return to Myanmar, when conditions are conducive to do so. Until then, we will promote refugees’ dignity and self-reliance, and support host community families.
THE ROAD AHEAD
World Vision continues to advocate for the Rohingya’s safe, voluntary and dignified return to Myanmar, when conditions are conducive to do so. Until then, we will promote refugees’ dignity and self-reliance, and support host community families. Photo: Jon Warren