World Vision International

Partnering and innovation

Multi-stakeholder partnerships provide critical assistance to the world’s most vulnerable children, families and communities, including during emergency situations.

While finances may play a role, collaborations and partnerships are also about skill-sharing, staff volunteering, advocacy, innovation, learning and research and complementary actions. By leveraging each other’s investments and work, this means reach, coverage and impact are extended – providing crucial assistance to communities and children in times of crises. It can also strengthen services and business opportunities, benefiting affected people long after the crisis.

World Vision’s Commitments

  • World Vision is committed to the Global Alliance for Humanitarian Innovation as a key mechanism for prioritising innovation and ensuring that it is an integral part of the new humanitarian business model.
  • World Vision commits to promoting ethical principled humanitarian and business action based on facilitating better mutual understanding of our roles and responsibilities, ensuring joint Monitoring and Evaluation, impact measurement of partnerships, continuous mutual capacity building and accountability. This includes interventions that strengthen civil society, local business and governments to meet the needs of the most vulnerable citizens, including children to increase the potential for locally inclusive economic growth and resilience.

Multi-stakeholder partnering and innovation must be a priority of all humanitarian actors

No entity can act alone to address the surmounting humanitarian needs. World Vision is committed to empowering national and local actors and engages with communities as first responders, not passive recipients. 

As man-made and natural disasters become more complex, the ability to share resources, develop skills and innovate through partnerships is essential to sustainable disaster management. 

The necessary transition from delivering aid to reducing need can only be achieved through collective action and true collaboration between governments, private enterprise, civil society and affected communities. While finances may play a role, collaborations and partnerships are also about skill-sharing, staff volunteering, advocacy, innovation, learning and research and complementary actions.

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World Vision’s multi-stakeholder partnerships show the impact of moving beyond a transactional approach.

World Vision’s collaboration with MasterCard aims to transform aid delivery through the adoption of electronic payment services, that include World Vision’s Last Mile Mobile Solutions (LMMS) and the MasterCard Aid Network, and strengthen business practices, such as digital identity standards.

World Vision worked collaboratively to develop the Humanitarian Private Sector Partnership e-Platform (HPPP) in East Africa, which connects multiple stakeholders in a disaster, including private sector organisations and businesses, United Nations, local, national and international non-governmental organisations and the government sector.

World Vision’s Innovation Lab, in response to the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, attracts and tests new products, ideas and processes that are not widely used within the humanitarian sector but can directly impact earthquake recovering and long-term development in Nepal.

By leveraging each other’s investments and work, this means reach, coverage and impact are extended – providing crucial assistance to communities and children in times of crises. It can also strengthen services and business opportunities, benefiting affected people long after the crisis.

Read more