World Vision International
emergency

Myanmar – Bangladesh Refugee Crisis

USD 434 million is needed now to fund life-saving humanitarian assistance for the refugees and those affected by the crisis. 
Millions have been pledged.

But more is needed. Everyone can help.

WHAT’S HAPPENING? WHY ARE THEY REFUGEES?

It has been one year since more than 700,000 refugees fled violence in Myanmar, crossing into Bangladesh. They settled in what is now the world's largest, most densely populated refugee camp. With the support of our donors and supporters, World Vision has been preventing and protecting children and their families from harm and abuse, while advocating for their rights. We have also met the immediate needs of more than 213,700 refugees through food and nutrition programmes, as well as providing water, hygiene and sanitation facilities and shelter construction materials.

WHERE ARE THEY?

Most of the refugees fleeing the violence in Myanmar crossed into Bangladesh, and have joined a series of makeshift camps near the south-eastern district of Cox’s Bazar.

HOW MANY ARE AFFECTED?

Some 900,000 refugees, including more than half a million children, are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance – this includes almost 680,000 who have crossed into Bangladesh since the latest wave of fighting in Rakhine State. Over 1.2 million people are affected by this crisis, including more than 470,000 people from the local community.

IS THIS THE BIGGEST REFUGEE CAMP IN THE WORLD?

One of the camp’s makeshift settlements, Kutupalong expansion site, which the Bangladesh government is developing, is the world’s largest refugee encampment with almost 585,000 refugees,  a more than five-fold increase in the site’s population since before August 2017.

WHAT ARE LIVING CONDITIONS LIKE?

Inadequate water and clean sanitation, limited access to and lack of adequate facilities, high population density, and poor environmental conditions contribute to the increased risk of disease outbreak amongst an already vulnerable population. The vast majority of newly arrived refugees, mostly women and children, are living in informal makeshift settlements, which have become a recruiting ground for traffickers looking to exploit refugees’ desperation.  Most refugees have physical injuries caused by rape, gunshots, shrapnel, fire, and landmines, as well as the more difficult to detect psychological wounds.

WHAT ABOUT THE LOCAL COMMUNITY?

The two sub-districts housing the refugee population in Bangladesh were already the country’s two lowest-performing ones in terms of humanitarian indicators even before the latest influx.  The local ‘host community’ and government have been very accommodating, but many of them, too, are living in poverty. As with every emergency response, the arrival of relief workers and contractors has driven up market prices, Support is needed for the local community of more than 470,000 people where the infrastructure is strained and scarcer than ever.

ARE THEY ALLOWED TO RETURN HOME?

In the five campsites where World Vision works, reactions have been mixed when refugees considered the prospect of return. The governments of Bangladesh and Myanmar have reached an agreement to repatriate a maximum of 300 refugees- who have verification papers- daily. Most refugees do not have any identity documents. Read more here

WHAT CAN I DO?

World Vision requires an estimated USD 15 million to implement an expanded nine-month humanitarian response plan from March 2018 to December 2018.

Six months after launching our ground response, our team has reached more than 150,000 people with food rations, shelter, and dedicated programming for women and children. You can help by keeping those affected in your prayers and donating through one of the below World Vision offices raising funds for this emergency.

Australia   Canada   France   Germany   Malaysia

New Zealand   Singapore   Switzerland   United Kingdom   United States

WHAT’S WORLD VISION DOING?

World Vision has prioritized the following seven interventions, and has already launched programming in five camps of the below areas:

  • Food assistance
  • Clean water
  • Hygiene and sanitation promotion
  • Temporary shelter
  • Child Friendly Space
  • Women and Young Children Space
  • Hygiene kits, clothes and baby kits
  • Kitchen sets

World Vision has been working in Bangladesh and Myanmar since 1972 and 1991, respectively, helping the most vulnerable children and families through both relief and development work. World Vision was working in the conflict-affected area in northern Rakhine State in Myanmar from 2016 until fighting cut off access.

 


 

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