World Vision Rwanda

Education

 

What we want to do:

We want to see all children in Rwanda have the opportunity to receive a quality education that will prepare them for the opportunities and challenges of the future. We are working towards this by:

  • Increasing children’s access to formal and non-formal education opportunities
  • Ensuring children who attend school are learning 

What is the problem?

The combination of a lack of qualified teachers, large class sizes, inadequate infrastructure and a shortage of instructional materials means that although 97% of children in Rwanda enroll in primary education, many of them are not learning the skills they need to succeed later in life.

  • The average primary classroom has 62 students for every teacher
  • Only 65.2% of students finish their primary school studies
  • Of the students who finish primary school, only 70% go on to enroll in secondary education.

How is World Vision addressing the issues?

We are training teachers in the Literacy Boost methodology to equip them with skills and resources to make functional literacy a priority and a reality in their classrooms.

Is what World Vision doing working?

We believe it will. The Literacy Boost method has been proven to increase literacy rates in a number of countries and contexts around the world. Our teams shifted our focus from access to education to quality of education in 2016. We are working with the government and other bilateral partners to ensure that quality education is available throughout Rwanda, not only in the areas where we are already working. We have taken baseline surveys and will be comparing the improvement in functional literacy in a year or two, once the programme has been firmly established.

What’s the impact?*

  • 15,988 more teachers received training
  • 3,960 parents and caregivers were trained in ways that they can support their children’s education.
  • 469 locally relevant and developmentally appropriate reading materials were created and distributed.
  • 105 reading clubs established
  • 50,096 students supported with literacy starter kits.

*From 2016 and 2017

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