The FMNR aims to create informal employment opportunities to 197 vulnerable Syrian refugees and 177 Lebanese in return of their work for restoring and improving select range-lands.

Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration helping locals and refugees

In Akkar, North of Lebanon, the local community, as well as the refugee community, suffer from the lack of job opportunities. Even though the area is known as an environmental treasure, it offers limited agriculture opportunities. Khaled, Firas, Fady, and Muhannad, are four young men participating in one of World Vision’s livelihoods projects – the Farmer’s Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) project.

The FMNR method is implemented in collaboration with the Union of Municipalities in Dreib Al Awsat It aims to create informal employment opportunities to 197 vulnerable Syrian refugees and 177 Lebanese in return of their work for restoring and improving select range-lands. By learning to apply FMNR, beneficiaries and the union would be contributing to restoring the lands’ growth, thus reinforcing environmental sustainability, as well as, simultaneously providing the beneficiaries with this informal employment opportunity, which would allow them to secure a job for the period of the project.

Khaled, a Syrian refugee residing in Akkar, participates in harvesting the trees and dead plants along the roads of the village. “The work we are doing will give the village and its roads a decent look and will help the nature “breathe” better and produce fresher air!” says Khaled.

Firas is a Lebanese young man participating in the project. He supervises the harvesting process and makes sure that the workers have all the necessary tools and equipment to ensure their safety. “I am very pleased about this project because of its impact on the nature and the income-generating opportunity it brought to some of the unemployed youth in Akkar,” he emphasizes. “It makes me happy that Akkar and its people were considered and included in this environmental project”.

Fady, a young Lebanese worker, plants and waters the bamboo plants along the Kweshra Lake in Akkar. “I gained so much knowledge throughout the training sessions, especially how to plant crops and how to take care of them,” he admits. “I am extremely grateful for this opportunity.”

Muhanad, a Syrian refugee residing in the area, works on the harvesting of trees and plants. “The work we do prevents fires and the damage they bring to the area,” expresses Muhanad. “Harvesting the trees is also good for the nature”.