Health, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

 

Burundi Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Health
Our Goal 

Improved health status of children under five and women of reproductive age.

What is the problem? 

Insufficient food intake, recurrent illness, lack of knowledge on infant and young child feeding practices, inadequate hygiene and sanitation practices and low access to quality health system put children in Burundi at risk daily.

What is World Vision doing? 

In the same way that the roots of these problems are often multifaceted and intertwined, our responses are as well. On one hand, we are working to improve families’ access to clean water and improved sanitation practices. And, on the other hand, we are equipping parents and communities to properly nourish their children and identify/address sickness when the symptoms first present themselves.

We are doing this through implementing the Integrated Community Case Management project, which is focused on protecting vulnerable populations, especially children, from preventable deaths (such as Malaria, Diarrhea and Pneumonia) by training community health workers to detect and address illnesses. We also work with partners, such as the Global Fund, to provide families with the tools they need, like bed nets, to protect themselves and their children from Malaria.

We are partnering with communities to increase easy, reliable access to clean water through the drilling of new boreholes and the restoration of non-functioning water systems. And, we are working with schools and health centers to ensure children and their families have access to clean water while they are studying or at a clinic by installing water points.

To address the sanitation and hygiene issues, we are educating communities about the risks and negative impacts of Open Defecation and poor sanitation processes and we are equipping families to build their own improved sanitation facilities. We are also partnering with communities to increase easy, reliable access to clean water through the drilling of new boreholes and the restoration of non-functioning water systems. And, we are working with schools and health centers to ensure children and their families have access to clean water while they are studying or at a clinic by installing water points. And, to improve hygiene processes, we are training children and their families at school and through community meetings about the importance and the steps of proper hygiene practice.

Is what World Vision doing working?

Yes! Although there is still work to do, we are encouraged by the increased number of children who are receiving medical attention when it is necessary. In 2017, more than half 54% of children with fevers were tested and treated (if necessary) for Malaria. We also celebrate an increase in the number of families (now 20% in the areas where we work) who use improved sanitation facilities. 

What’s the impact?*
  • 4,511 pregnant women received at least one visit from a Community Health Worker
  • 56,406 children were treated for Malaria at home by a Community Health Worker
  • 88 new and rehabilitated water points were provided
  • 1,762 latrines were built
  • 100 hand washing stations installed

 *Numbers from 2017

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