World Vision Mali

Child Protection and Participation

 

What we want to do: 

We want to see children in Mali who know they are loved by God and their neighbours and who are cared for, protected and participating in the decisions that affect them and their lives. We are working towards this by:

  • Ensuring families and communities understand children’s rights
  • Helping families understand the importance of birth registration 
  • Making sure children live in safe communities with adequate places to play and develop
  • Making sure children are respected and allowed to participate in decisions that affect them

What is the problem? 

A lack of understanding about the rights of children and responsibilities of adults, coupled with persistent and harmful cultural practices, such as child marriage, child labour, Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and violent discipline and a weak system of law to protect the rights of children put many children at risk daily in Mali.

How is World Vision addressing the issues? 

We are increasing the communities’ ability to advocate for and monitor the implementation of laws and policies designed to protect children. We are working to reduce gender-based violence and strengthening the mechanisms that allow children to have a voice at both community and national levels. And, we are raising community awareness about the importance of birth certificates and their abilities to request them. 

Is what World Vision doing working? 

Yes! More children have access to their birth certificates (95.4% in 2017 compared with 92.7% in 2016) and more children, youth and adolescents (66%) reported that they feel protected from abuse, exploitation, and other forms of violence, such as early marriage in 2017.

What’s the impact?* 

  • 12,360 children are participating in 290 kids clubs, where they learn about their rights and how to defend them
  • 285 faith leaders and their spouses were trained in the rights and the protection of children

Related Resources

  • See how our programmes and community education are protecting young girls, like Barakissa, from becoming child brides