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This 9th Independence Day of South Sudan, I dream of a brighter future for our children

The COVID-19 pandemic has made difficult conditions in South Sudan, especially for a father like me. I work in Juba as World Vision’s Senior People and Culture Manager and I was joined by my wife. But our three children were left behind in Kampala to study. With the lockdown on borders, our weekly trips to see them stopped.

My wife Teresa and I try to talk to the children every morning and before they go to sleep in the evening. But as parents, even if my sister-in-law watches over them, we always worry of their situation. The pandemic taught us to rely on God’s grace and protection for our families, just like many families around the world who got separated.

We installed a handwashing facility at home so they can wash their hands regularly, observe social distancing, and educated them of the risks that coronavirus brings to everyone. They were also encouraged to share what they know to their friends.

Abraham's dream shared on South Sudan's 9th Independence Day is a better future, not just for his children, but the country's millions of children. 

 

I started working with World Vision as a facilitator for an assessment work in 2005, a volunteer for two weeks and upon seeing my dedication at work, I was hired as a casual worker in Greater Tonj Food Aid Project thereafter.

Back then, there were many challenges. What I cannot forget was the time I spent three days in the bush on our way to pay the salary of 1,400 staff in then Greater Tonj Counties in Warrap State. Our vehicle got stuck in the mud and despite our efforts, would not budge. We waited for another vehicle to rescue us as we mobilized people in the nearby village for help.

On this 9th Independence Day of South Sudan and faced with one of the world’s most difficult global emergency, my dream is to see a better South Sudan emerging from all its challenges. I chose to serve my country and help this dream become a reality.

The road condition in these remote areas was badly damaged by bad weather and difficult for vehicles to maneuver. But the worst thing was, these areas were usually surrounded by thick forests. We were terrified of the danger and what can happen next as wild animals like lions, hyenas, leopard, and many others circled our vehicle.

In 2006, I became the Assistant Food Monitor, after which I served in several positions until I was promoted as Assistant Human Resource Officer for World Vision’s Greater Tonj Counties. After 13 years of challenges and achievements, and now in the position I have worked hard for, I can say it took a lot of commitment and determination.

With youngest son, Abraham and wife Teresa ensure the children are aware of the risks faced amid COVID-19.

 

I am now a father of eight. My children live in Uganda for a better education. Most of South Sudan’s schools were damaged during the conflict and still needs rehabilitation. My dream is for my family to live together one day and serve their own country like what I am doing.

Leading World Vision’s Peer Support Team in South Sudan is one of the most important responsibilities I have held as it contributes to helping change the mindset of our staff and community at large. It always made work very fulfilling for me. Several staff members were tested positive and in full recovery, peer support is crucial at this period.

On this 9th Independence Day of South Sudan and faced with one of the world’s most difficult global emergency, my dream is to see a better South Sudan emerging from all its challenges. I chose to serve my country and help this dream become a reality.

Blog by Abraham Mabior, Senior People and Culture Manager. I  Photos by Scovia Faida Charles Duku, Communications Coordinator