Remote Armenian hospitals receive medical equipment

An infant warmer, as well as an infant suction pump were delivered last week to Ijevan hospital in north-eastern Armenia, which urgently needed to improve the services of the maternity ward.

These activities are part of the USAID-funded Mobile Outreach Teams (MOT) project aimed at increasing access to medical care for people in remote areas.

Currently, many district hospitals in Armenia fail to provide necessary services to the patients because of lack of medical equipment and poor facilities, as a result of insufficient funding.

“Every month 30 to 40 children are born at the hospital. Because of the lack of heating we could not maintain required temperature at the maternity ward and had to use bottles with hot water in order to keep the newborn babies warm,” says Armine Dovlatbekyan, the post-natal care doctor.

The infant warmer radiates heat and is designed to minimize heat loss in newborns.

Every month 30 to 40 children are born at the hospital. Because of the lack of heating we could not maintain required temperature at the maternity ward and had to use bottles with hot water in order to keep the newborn babies warm “Thanks to World Vision, we now are able to ensure adequate and secure environment for newborns. The warmer also allows to provide necessary therapy for children with infant jaundice or premature children,” says Narine Tumanyan, Deputy Head of the hospital. In the past, children in need of special care often had to be taken to a hospital in Yerevan, the capital.

In the scope of the MOT project, district hospitals in Kapan, Goris, Noyemberyan and Chambarak received surgical instrument kits, medical devices, reagents and other equipment.

World Vision donated a computer and delivered 40 sets of mattresses, pillows and bedding to Tashir hospital in Lori region. According to the hospital authorities, during the last 25 years the hospital did not receive such items and patients had to bring their own mattresses and bed sheets.

Thanks to World Vision, we now are able to ensure adequate and secure environment for newborns. The warmer also allows to provide necessary therapy for children with infant jaundice or premature children World Vision’s Mobile Outreach Teams regularly provide primary health services to 45,000 people in 99 remote villages, including laboratory tests, ultrasound examinations and referrals to district doctors. Over the past year, World Vision carried out the renovation of 19 rural health posts and 8 district hospitals. In addition, 29 health posts were furnished and provided with medical supplies and equipment.